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yagazieemezi:

MEET FASHION ARTIST/ILLUSTRATOR PAPA OPPONG 

"I’ve always loved the idea of designing clothes. For as long as I can remember, I’ve been drawing fashion figures and styling them myself on paper. I remember how I would get into so much trouble in primary, junior and senior high school for drawing on the school desks, my class work and homework books. I grew up in a home where everyone was generally very fashion conscious. My mum Cynthia and her sister, my aunt Stella were very trendy women who wore very fashionable clothes. Even when I was younger, my mum and aunt would ask me what I thought of their outfits and sometimes even ask me to make fashion suggestions. As time went by, I became more and more fascinated with fashion and art and would go on to watch a lot runway shows and study designers that I admired." (read more on vlisco)

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

10.20.14 1284
Zoom ggariba:

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ggariba:

👀

10.20.14 705
…the story of migrations and connections between Haiti and Jamaica in the nineteenth century which, though little-known and much smaller than twentieth-century migration, were very important. After emancipation from slavery in the British Caribbean in 1838, Jamaica was more attractive to migrating Haitians. This migration was fairly continuous. In Kingston they worked, cultivated friendships, traveled around the island, married Jamaicans, raised children, and made new lives for themselves. When they returned to Haiti, as many did, they carried these experiences with them. In turn, the interactions connected the two islands and over time Haiti became a site of Jamaican migration in the nineteenth century… the Caribbean was not as divided as we often think. We need to revise how we perceive island relations. Travel between the islands was much easier than it is nowadays. Migrations more tangibly connected the islands and made people there more aware of their neighbors. Take for instance the long-standing view that post-Revolutionary Haiti was a threat to the political stability of its neighbors who feared its influence and export. While this may have been a perpetual feature of colonial and elite discourse, the presence of Haitians in Jamaica and vice versa challenge the perception of successful campaigns to isolate the islands from one another. Haiti represented much more than an endless series of revolutions and dictatorships. It also offered opportunities that could be tapped by the freedpeople from the British islands who went there or the middle-class merchants who organized business networks between the islands. Over several decades these migrations led to the formation of lasting networks that superseded island or imperial boundaries.

Michael J. Smith

Migrations and Microhistories: An interview with historian Matthew J. Smith (thepublicarchive.com)

10.19.14 0
Zoom largeupdotcom:

Today would have been Peter Tosh’s 70th birthday.

largeupdotcom:

Today would have been Peter Tosh’s 70th birthday.

10.19.14 26

devoutfashion:

Print All Over Me 

DJ Smith by Tom Neal

10.18.14 317
Zoom shevyvision:

One of my images from #Havana #Cuba from tomorrow’s gallery show ‘Women in Focus’ featuring my work with women around the world and especially World Literature Today #wlt #women #photography #gallery #travel #fineartphotography #photooftheday

shevyvision:

One of my images from #Havana #Cuba from tomorrow’s gallery show ‘Women in Focus’ featuring my work with women around the world and especially World Literature Today #wlt #women #photography #gallery #travel #fineartphotography #photooftheday

10.18.14 27
Vanity only requires a mirror but arrogance always requires another person.

— Al ghazali (via suhblahym)

10.17.14 6
Zoom ggariba:

The Clarke sisters 💖✨

ggariba:

The Clarke sisters 💖✨

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maarnayeri:

Eritrean Visual/Coptic Realism artist Michael Adonai

Adonai was born in 1962, in Asmara, Eritrea. He joined the Eritrean People’s Liberation Front (EPLF) in 1977, and began studying fine art at the EPFL Cultural Establishment in 1978. Upon the completion of his three-year training, he participated in a number of international art shows. His work has been shown in Eritrea, Europe, East and South Africa, USA, Middle East, Singapore, and Japan; his solo exhibitions include the 1993 exhibit at the National Museum of Ethiopia, the 2002 Earth Summit exhibition in Johannesburg, and Nature’s Wisdom exhibition in Japan in 2005. He is a five-time winner of Eritrea’s national painting competitions, including the prestigious Raimok prize in 2002. In addition to his visual art, he has authored five books and co-authored two.

Here’s his Facebook page which features more of his captivating pieces.

10.16.14 931
Zoom 
The River Of Sand In Mali by Jean Luc Manaud

The River Of Sand In Mali by Jean Luc Manaud

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